Be Happier. Learn Better.

Welcome To Ruby on the Beach

9 weeks. 12 students per class.
4 students per instructor.

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We're a tech bootcamp. In Bali. We run 9-week courses, in Ruby, Rails and JS. For amazing people from all around the world - like you.

And we think your learning experience should be awesome, fulfilling and life-changing - not gruelling. We know that you learn best when you're happy and relaxed. So we focus on keeping you that way. Ruby on the Beach really is a better way to learn.

We help you develop skills for your next career - as developer, digital nomad or web entrepreneur - skills you'd never believe you could master in such a short time.

Ruby on the Beach has a special, intensive program for those who want to learn to code, and build new businesses around code they create.

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Entrepreneur's
Incubator

Transformation is the Goal.
Paradise is a Perk.

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Expand Your Skillset.
And Your Mind.

Our students learn to code. Really learn - best practices and creating impressive projects that they can extend and manage once they graduate - or translate into great jobs.

But they also get something that's really rare - the chance to step out, look at, and evaluate their goals, and how they fit their life. And that leads to change - really great change. Like when someone who wants to be junior dev discovers their entrepreneurial goals, along with the skills to realize them.

Others have changed their lives through Ruby on the Beach. Now it's your turn.

WHO?

Is RotB For You?

Lawyers, entrepreneurs, rock guitarists, graphic designers, architects - we've helped all these to be successful coders, junior developers and digital creators.

Breathe. Code. Breathe Code.

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The NO Burnout Bootcamp

No Burnout Means Learning More, Not Less

Our on-site yoga classes are part of the no-burnout approach that we've built Ruby on the Beach around. Other bootcamps have yoga classes - but work you 70+ hours. At Ruby on the Beach, average class time is 45 hours a week.

We're the world's first - and best - destination-based bootcamp. We were looking for a way to change the bootcamp learning environment to one that supports the learning process, not antagonize it. And guess what?

We found it.

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Instructor: Trip

Coder. Author. Artist. Yogi. Instructor…

Participant: Stephanie

Motivator For Female Entrepreneurs

Instructor: Bret

Multidimensional Code Guru

Participant: Colyn

Shredding and Coding

Instructor: Dan

Eminence Grise

Learn. And Learn to Learn

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80% Of Our Grads Are Working In Code.

We're proud of catering to an incredibly diverse group of participants. Entrepreneurs, aspiring junior developers and digital nomads - all find their way to becoming confident, capable coders with us.

And that diverse group is gender-balanced. And we provide opportunity for host-country participants with full scholarships. At Ruby on the Beach, we don't restrict ourselves - or you - to targeting a cubicle job. We want to hear about your goals, and build a plan to realize them. With the best instructor to student ratio in the business, the level of personalization we offer means you can define your own outcomes.

What we're proudest of is that the vast majority of our students realize their coding goals after Ruby on the Beach.

Tech Bootcamp, Rebooted.

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Let's Start The
Conversation

Whether Ruby on the Beach suits you is something we'd love to explore with you.

Our intake process is about understanding your goals, and answering your questions. The process is about understanding your motivations, figuring out your learning style, and talking about how you'll deal with 9 weeks of intensive learning with a tight, smart and motivated group of students from around the world.

We want you to explore the site, understand what we're about, and when you're ready to talk, schedule a meeting with us. Our participants have turned into long-term friends, and a network to help continue learning. We're looking forward to meeting you.

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Our Courses

Ruby on the Beach offers a nine-week program, composed of two of our courses. Most students take the nine-week program, which is the close equivalent of other bootcamps.

Our nine-week bootcamp program is made up of two courses, called Ruby Newbie, and Casually Impressive, which are taken sequentially. Ruby Newbie is a pre-requisite for the second course. It's preparation for our other courses, including our Javascript course, Client Master.

Although Ruby Newbie focuses on the Ruby programming language, it acts as a general introduction to programming. It covers developer tools like Terminal, Git, standard editors, RVM, and other tools. This gives anyone interested in becoming a developer - or simply understanding what programming is like - a solid foundation. Students can opt to take this courses on its own, or to take it and then take either Casually Impressive, or Client Master, or both, at a later date.

Casually Impressive shifts the focus to project-focused learning. For four weeks, on an approximately 4-day cycle, you'll build projects that you'll increasingly direct at the design level. And with each project, you'll learn a new set of enabling technologies. With each project, you'll develop a richer, more powerful set of techniques and abilities that compound your abilities as a programmer.

Our courses are four weeks long: the exception is Client Master, which has an optional fifth week at the beginning for those with no experience with Javascript, but who are familiar with the developer basics taught in Ruby Newbie.

Our standard program is nine weeks long because we include a one-week break period between the two courses. This is intended to allow students the chance to catch up on any material not fully assimilated in the first half; to travel in Bali and the surrounding area; and to give a break from coding, a time to consolidate your knowledge.

Instructors And Classes

More than any other factors, your bootcamp experience, and what you get out of it, depends on three things:

  • Instructors
  • Instructor/Student Ratio
  • Class Sizes

Instructors: At Ruby on the Beach, every instructor has senior developer experience. No recent bootcamp graduates, no junior developers hired to save money. We believe that the core value of any bootcamp is the contact time with senior developers. That means that you'll get the perspective of more than one senior developer: believe it, there are many ways to approach coding problems, and this diversity of perspective is key to learning to think flexibly when solving coding problems.

Any Ruby on the Beach instructor can answer just about any question you throw at them. You won't be waiting for just the one instructor who actually has the experience to help you. And that matters, because when you give this much of your money and time to a bootcamp, they shouldn't leave you waiting.

Instructor Ratios: We observed that when your instructor ratio gets below around 6:1, you start to see lagging students, poorly retained material, and a rising level of frustration in the classroom. No matter how good your instructors are, they can only address so many questions in a given time. So while underresourcing classes is a great way for a bootcamp to save money, it means you have less time with your instructors, and each problem gets less attention.

At 4:1, our ratio is about twice as good as our nearest competitors, and far better than that for many. So you'll always have the instructor access you need. That translates to lower frustration, higher levels of retention, and a better learning experience for everyone involved.

Class Sizes: Once you've established an instructor/student ratio, the work's not over. You have to think about the dynamics of larger groups as well. That's why we capped our class size at 12. At twelve, your group has coherence, you'll know everyone well within a week. Some bootcamps are double that size: a few are four times. Twelve is a size that just seems to be the sweet spot for building the crucial social side of bootcamp, and coding: while there are large coding teams, most developers work in groups of 3 to 8, and your experience at Ruby on the Beach reproduces that.

Bali, Indonesia

For most people, the first thing that sets us apart from other bootcamps is our location. We run our bootcamps in Bali, Indonesia, one of the most truly beautiful, culturally rich, engaging and pleasant places on earth. But what does being in Bali have to do with learning code? Is this a "take a holiday and pretend to learn code" setup?

An Environment For Focused Learning.

We're in Bali because, after searching the world, and looking at dozens of locations, Bali is where we can offer what we really want you to experience. We began Ruby on the Beach with a goal of improving on, not simply recreating the mistakes of, all the other bootcamps. And high on that list was the goal of teaching in an environment, and on a schedule meant to enhance, not detract from learning.

What were the things that we made priorities in creating Ruby on the Beach?

  • Infrastructure
  • Safety
  • Positive Environment

Infrastructure: The internet has taken over Indonesia, and with a huge tourism economy, Bali in particular offers great access. Our courses are offered in co-working spaces that have premium internet service, and you'll find speeds that are up to standard. Even in restaurants, bars and cafes that dot Ubud and other major towns, free internet is the norm. And all accommodation has wifi provided.

Safety: Bali offers an amazing, safe environment. You can move around on the streets at night with security, there are ample taxis to get you where you want to go, and in general, Bali offers a level of security that distinguishes it from many travel destinations.

Positive Environment: It's not for nothing that Bali is put in a category above almost every other destination. With a unique Hindu culture that is both robust and welcoming, extraordinary beaches and recreation, a fantastic variety of food, and unlimited natural beauty, Bali in engaging, without being distracting- just what's needed for a 9-week focused learning experience.

Step Out Of Your Life, Into Learning.

Far from normal distractions, coding isn't competing with texts, calls and a thousand friends calling you up. Your commute will be a few minutes on scooter. And when you need to relax, recharge and assimilate what you've learned, there are a thousand things to explore with your classmates and instructors that will get you to ready. Bali gives you focus, well-being and a chance to really implement the change that starting to code implies.

A Typical Day

What does a typical day at Ruby on the Beach look like?

Week days are a regular cycle: class starts at 8AM. We take generous breaks for lunch, and complete our day of classes at around 4:30 or 5. Every other day, we'll have on-site yoga classes.

Every day begins with standup sessions, where we get to talk about what we're working on, what's coming up, and what we've done of previous goals we've discussed at standup. Weeks end with retros, a session where we try to sum up the week, talk about how we're doing overall, and exchange ideas and discoveries, and plan our weekends.

Exercise-Based Work

What happens on a given day depends on what class you're currently doing. During Ruby Newbie, our intro course, you'll follow a structured program that generally has 4 separate learning units. These generally involve a very short talk from a dev about what you're going to learn: some written material that tells you some more, and provides some links to explore. Many of our students like to read these in advance.

The majority of the time in any learning unit is spent doing exercises that go with it. In these, you're given problems to solve using techniques that are given as examples. The goal isn't to produce identical, boiler-plate solutions, but to also think creatively about what you're learning. When it's appropriate, an instructor might assign the class, or those who are interested some advanced exercises that take what's learned further.

With four such units per day, the first four weeks cover about 100 learning units that cover the broad skillset needed to work in code. Testing is available to verify what you've learned, and everything is contained in a Learning Management System that allows you to access and review everything.

Advanced Courses

In advanced courses like Casually Impressive, the structure is looser, but still retains the yoga, the standup and retro elements. Most work is done in teams of 3, and you'll spend a lot of time conferring with your team mates; pushing and merging code, managing deployments and researching solutions needed for maker projects. Along the way you'll do individual work and in pairs to discover techniques, gems and tools that can enhance your project goals. Each participant has the opportunity to work as Team Lead, and teams get changed up so that things don't get stale, and you learn from each other to the greatest potential.

Code reviews, debugging sessions, hackathons and milestone-based presentations round out the time, with more of this happening in later courses than Ruby Newbie.

Extracurricular

It's hard to cover all the things that you'll do when you're not in class. Your days will begin in lovely villas that offer great views, have pools and air conditioning, usually their own cooking facility if you want to keep a domestic routine, and of course wifi. A lot of travel can be done by scooter or by taxi, and you'll quickly discover cafes, restaurants, co-working centers and other hangouts that'll become favourite places to have a drink, a bite, do some coding, and hang out together with your team mates, and the many others you'll meet.

Weekends allow trips to the beach, to the volcanic and mountainous countryside, whitewater rafting, biking, cooking classes, cultural events both traditional and contemporary,… the list is really endless.

We can't end off without talking about the amazing ritual life of Bali. Ubud, our home, is the cultural centre of Bali, which is one of the most culturally rich and ancient cultures in the world. Processions, full-moon ceremonies, birth and death celebrations, and on and on are both highly visible, and largely accessible to you as a respectful spectator. It's hard to spend time in Bali without being profoundly affected by the culture, friendliness and opportunities that it offers.

Living in Bali

Bali is an extraordinary place to spend even a small amount of time. Their ancient Balinese Hindu culture is vibrant and very alive there - something that you'll encounter every day, in the ceremonies, parades, and offerings that you encounter in the streets as you walk around.

Staying for two months and being stuck in a classroom would hardly be worth it. You won't miss the unique experiences that Bali offers when you're on course with Ruby on the Beach. Fortunately, Indonesia has a flexible and well-organized visa system that allows you to remain in the country for the extended period of the bootcamp.

On course, you'll spend your classtime in town, in one of the larger centers. We tend to stay out of the biggest tourist centers, to avoid the distractions that the tourist beach towns present. But Ubud, our current base, is a great place where restaurants, cultural centers and yoga studios abound. Bali is a relatively small place: you'll easily find your way to many different places on the island - and the reasonable hours of Ruby on the Beach means you'll have the time to do so.

English is spoken in all larger towns, so you'll cope easily in getting the things you want. The Balinese are famously generous, friendly and inviting, so even when you don't share a language, you'll find interacting with people you meet will be fun and rewarding. But the Indonesian language is very easy to pick up, and a few words will go a long way.

Weekends will probably be the most intensive times to explore and interact. On course, we usually organize a volcano climb, and climbing Mt Agung in the middle of the night to greet the sunrise is an old and beautiful experience you'll have to try. But besides volcanoes, the natural beauty in Bali is everywhere, and things like whitewater rafting, hiking, biking, surfing, swimming and chilling on the beach will fill various weekends.

The truly wonderful thing about a two month course is that you'll have the time for things like monkeys in the street, full moon ceremonies, and the pure open skies of the Southern Hemisphere to become comfortable and even familiar. Our students consistently say that being in this magical island is a massive contribution to their experience as new coders. Expect to love it - and expect to remember the Ruby on the Beach experience as one of the central events of your life.

Break Time

Bootcamps can be relentless. We've done everything we can to ensure that we can eliminate the long hours, and still provide you with a better learning experience.

Break time is deeply integrated into the Ruby on the Beach experience, as an integral part of that goal. Not only will you have evenings free - 7 or 8, not 10 or 12 hour days are the norm - but weekends, and a generous 7 to 9 day mid-course break will allow you to recharge, explore and generally ensure that you're happy. Because we fundamentally believe that relentless work and no time away is actually destructive of your learning experience.

Break time is just one way of creating a burnout-free environment. Break time isn't time off from learning - it's the crucial time that you assimilate what you've learned. Many studies support the model for learning that requires time away from what's studied to consolidate that new knowledge, and that stress reduces our efficiency as learners and workers - break time ensures that stress is a controlled factor for our students.

Students we've spoken to who attened other bootcamps with very demanding hours report consistently the sense of declining efficiency over the course of a bootcamp. As the initial energy that comes with enthusiasm, a new situation and exciting prospects ahead fades, the strong sense pervades that their ability to learn declines. And our experience with other bootcamps we've been associated with bears this out.

No Burnout

Worse, finishing a bootcamp in a state of burnout - or worse still, dropping out because of burnout - is not the preparation you need for the potential that opens up to you with your new coding skills. Our students maintain incredible energy to the end, group dynamics don't suffer from fatigue, and as the class ends, it's inspiring to to see the charged up, excitement of our graduates as they head into the world.

As much as all that, the unique location and experiences of Ruby on the Beach acts as a break from your life. The focus it gives, the chance to really examine your goals - and the presence of great instructors that know your new field - make our program something that can profoundly affect your life, your goals and your sense of your abilities. We hope you'll join us.

Entrepreneurialism

Few skills are more inherently entrepreneurial than coding. Imagine creating the tools that will run a business with no real limits to growth, using just a laptop, an internet connection, and the profusion of free software that exists for the using. Now compare that to the old-school model of creating a business, involving suppliers and shipping and warehouses and…

It's easy to get ahead of yourself: like any kind of business, not all digital businesses survive. But we feel strongly that one thing that could really bring the numbers up is the participation of traditional bricks and mortar entrepreneurs in coding. Entrepreneurs who've built businesses know a lot that matters when creating a business - things that not all the young coders in Silicon Valley know. So that makes them that much more powerful as entrepreneurs with a code education.

Ruby on the Beach has been attractive to entrepreneurs, and those with an entrepreneurial idea. Partly its our approach, partly it's the access to instructors, which gives our participants a chance to really work through app ideas with senior devs.

If your ambitions are to use Ruby on the Beach as a platform to build your idea from, you won't be the first. We'd love to talk to you.

Digital Nomadism

Will you talk for the rest of your life about how great it was to spend 2 or three months in a warehouse space in Chicago or New York or San Francisco? Then why choose that - especially if you could get as good or better education, more facetime with instructors, and get some serious beach time in while you were doing it? Very few skills have more inherent mobility baked into them than coding does. So it's obvious that with that freedom built into what you'll learn at Ruby on the Beach, it makes sense to take advantage of that mobility when choosing a bootcamp.

Of all the outcomes for students at Ruby on the Beach, Digital Nomadism seems to be the most intriguing. Digital nomads do digital work that depends on little other than the presence of a decent internet connection. That frees them up to do that work wherever makes them happy. (A good ability to manage timezones helps too). If what you do can be done entirely through a connection, digital nomadism is next-level telecommuting. And Ruby on the Beach is part of this trend.

There's another side to this: Bali is one of the great world centers for digital nomads. With pervasive internet access, co-working centers springing up, and a great inexpensive lifestyle, you'll meet many people already living this life. In fact, some of our graduates have gone straight from the course to working, creating and getting paid while continuing to travel, or stay in Bali. Part of the logic of digital nomadism arises from the many knowledge workers out there who have clients in multiple locations. If your clients aren't all in one place, then no one place will make them happy - so you may as well be in a place you love.

There's an argument that says you should learn where the coding is happening, so you should head to a major center for bootcamp. But thanks to Digital Nomadism, coding is happening everywhere. The co-working spaces we work in attract many nomadic coders. Digital Nomadism may not be on your immediate radar. But it's happening. And once you're learning with us, the idea that you have to go to a particular city like San Fran to learn coding might start to look as dated as the idea of commuting to the office from the suburbs.

Break Time

Bootcamps can be relentless. We've done everything we can to ensure that we can eliminate the long hours, and still provide you with a better learning experience.

Break time is deeply integrated into the Ruby on the Beach experience, as an integral part of that goal. Not only will you have evenings free - 7 or 8, not 10 or 12 hour days are the norm - but weekends, and a generous 7 to 9 day mid-course break will allow you to recharge, explore and generally ensure that you're happy. Because we fundamentally believe that relentless work and no time away is actually destructive of your learning experience.

Break time is just one way of creating a burnout-free environment. Break time isn't time off from learning - it's the crucial time that you assimilate what you've learned. Many studies support the model for learning that requires time away from what's studied to consolidate that new knowledge, and that stress reduces our efficiency as learners and workers - break time ensures that stress is a controlled factor for our students.

Students we've spoken to who attened other bootcamps with very demanding hours report consistently the sense of declining efficiency over the course of a bootcamp. As the initial energy that comes with enthusiasm, a new situation and exciting prospects ahead fades, the strong sense pervades that their ability to learn declines. And our experience with other bootcamps we've been associated with bears this out.

No Burnout

Worse, finishing a bootcamp in a state of burnout - or worse still, dropping out because of burnout - is not the preparation you need for the potential that opens up to you with your new coding skills. Our students maintain incredible energy to the end, group dynamics don't suffer from fatigue, and as the class ends, it's inspiring to to see the charged up, excitement of our graduates as they head into the world.

As much as all that, the unique location and experiences of Ruby on the Beach acts as a break from your life. The focus it gives, the chance to really examine your goals - and the presence of great instructors that know your new field - make our program something that can profoundly affect your life, your goals and your sense of your abilities. We hope you'll join us.

Project Work

Our instructor to student ratios allow us to accelerate the learning rate in the first half. This means that by week 5, you'll be ready to build real-world projects of increasing sophistication.

That allows the work after Ruby Newbie to be entirely project-based. You'll build dozens of small projects during Casually Impressive. Many of these will be MVP's - Minimal Viable Products - that you'll use to learn a wide variety of techniques and approaches, and become familiar with broad range of typologies, design patterns and so on.

These MVPs typically take a few hours, and support development of major projects that you'll work on over a week or so. This work happens teams of three participants. Major projects start off with design briefs that your team will work up and complete. You'll learn to manage the design and scope of projects as you repeatedly build out projects, and get a sense of how much can really be done in a set time - a crucial developer skill.

Weekly projects also allow each participant to be a team lead. As weeks pass, each new project takes the techniques learned in the previous week's project as a starting point. In this way, you build on what's familiar, reinforcing learned skills, while constantly learing new ones. And each new project gives your team greater latitude to direct the design and approach, allowing you to explore and reshape projects to suit your goals.

The goal is that by the end of week 9, you'll have a Github repository with several projects, all of which you've contributed to, and all of which you'll use as part of your job search, or as the basis of your own projects, post-course.

What You'll Learn

We've built our bootcamp program to do two things:

  • Provide Core Junior Developer Skills
  • Provide Flexibility To Allow Custom Outcomes

Junior Dev Skills: We totally get it. A primary criterion for many attending any bootcamp is going to be, "Will I learn enough to get a decent job?". And the answer is - of course. Thats the minimum standard for what we do.

80% of our participants find jobs in code within a few months of graduating. Keep in mind that not all are seeking jobs: some are designers with existing businesses, some are entrepreneurs, some go on to incubator programs. The code education at Ruby on the Beach provides a full technical preparation for a junior developer position.

Custom Outcomes: We emphasize the ratio of instructors to students we offer. It allows us to create a highly focused, rapid path to learning developer basics. Our students learn the core skills in just 4 weeks: skills that take up to three times as long to pick up in other bootcamps. It's not magic, our instructor ratio and small class sizes are why.

This allows the second course in our nine week bootcamp program to focus on student-directed research. And that means that you have a great deal of freedom to develop the skills and learn techniques that you determine will best drive you towards your goals.

What you actually learn beyond the first-half core is what you work out with your instructors, and your co-participants. We encourage a structured system of skill exchange: if you learn Google Map APIs, exchange what you've learned with someone else who just figured out Redis. Our instructors are there to take your ideas, questions and goals, advise and guide you towards your goals - besides the constant assistance in solving code problems. And because the second four weeks are less structured learning units, your instructor face time is up to 4 times that of other bootcamps. No other bootcamp provides the 5 hours a week working with instructors one-on-one that our focus allows. That gives you the input that should be the core value of any bootcamp: sustained time with seasoned industry pros.

Curriculum

What happens when you run into a tough coding problem when you're learning? What about when something you covered last week didn't stick, and you want to go back over it?

Of course, instructors are the crucial bootcamp resource. Those who've tried to learn coding online or on their own know about the show-stopping frustration - which is exactly what knowledgeable and attentive instructors dispell quickly and efficiently. So at Ruby on the Beach, we have the best ratio of instructors to students of any bootcamp in the business. By a factor of more than two in most cases.

You'll depend on the instructors, but you'll quickly realize that without an established curriculum that you can go back to when something needs review, or when you're trying to understand how what you're learning relates to what you've learned, and what you're learning next, that instructors aren't the right resource.

Enter Curriculum

At that point, you need a curriculum. Not something cobbled together from various sources, written without reference to each other. A bit of Treehouse, and a tutorial somewhere else, and a Stackoverflow page for something else: What you'll benefit most from is a custom-developed curriculum, where each part has been carefully researched and written. Each part should act in an interlocking way with the other parts, and all adding up to a coherent, easily understood and used body of techniques that will provide the basis for solid understanding.

Considering that we spend so much time talking about how important our instructors are, you might be surprised to know that we're most proud of our curriculum. If the instructors are so great, why is curriculum so important to us?

It's not that complicated, but it's something important. If you've got curriculum as a resource, you can get your basic questions answered more easily, leaving your instructors more time to respond to the tougher questions, guide you further in your learning process, and generally make everyone's experience a better one.

That's what we offer at Ruby on the Beach. Our curriculum is a highly organized, modular and easy-to-use system that is available at all times - including post-course. So you can continue to use it as a reference in your post-course development.

One on One

One on one sessions are built into the structure of Ruby on the Beach. Our courses keep time demands on instructors down, thanks to the 4:1 ratio of students to instructors. That means you can easily, and frequently schedule one-on-one sessions with instructors.

Focus

What do you use a one-on-one session for? To solve a technical problem. To develop an idea for something you want to build into a project, where help assessing your approach is key. To talk about employment strategies, or how to scale your idea past your first million users. One on Ones provide sustained time to explore what you want to explore, in ways that are only possible when instructors have the time that great ratios allow.

One on ones can be used as part of building your strategy post course. Instructors can help shape your goals to improve your employment chances. That might be directing you to resources on the web, setting up discussions with developers, or connecting you with recruiters. It could be helping you figure out how to contribute to an open source project, or setting up your own.

One on ones can involve more than one student, and more than one instructor. However you or your team use them, they make the time in class more about collaboration and move past basic instruction. They let our participants to also really focus on the things besides code that are important. You're attending bootcamp to make a change in your life. We get that. We want to be part of the process, and an one on one sessions are the best way to make that happen.

Hours and Stress

Prepare to change you expectations if you expect a really great bootcamp to entail long hours and high stress. We don't believe there's any basis to think that subjecting yourself to those kinds of conditions does anything but reduce your ability to learn. And a bootcamp's worth of it will dump you out the other end exhausted and mentally unprepared for the challenge of moving forward with a code career. Stress is not the magic ingredient for learning as much as possible.

Our challenge when creating Ruby on the Beach was to create the alternative. And we did. To do it, we had to change a lot of the "givens" that other bootcamps work with. That's why we're in Bali: from a purely economic point of view, it makes it easier to run smaller classes with more teachers, with more experience. And that - more than any other factor - is what determines the quality of your bootcamp experience, based purely on learning outcomes, and ignoring the amazing experience that goes along with our way of doing things.

Other bootcamps expect you to spend about 30-60% more time working each week, but we don't see any evidence that they teach you any more, or leave you better prepared. So you might wonder, what happens in the extra time you'd spend in another bootcamp? Basic math and experience makes us think that probably that's time spent frustrated, unable to get the attention of an instructor, and making no real progress. At Ruby on the Beach, the latency time to get help approaches zero, and the help comes from senior developers - the only kind of instructor we have.

But what about those "extra" 20+ hours at other bootcamps? As far as we can tell, that's time spent trying to manage student questions - time not needed when you've got our student/instructor ratios, and small, manageable classes. What we do know is that our students cover as much or more as other bootcamps in a stress-free, no burnout way.

So what do we use those extra hours for? Surfing. Hiking. Dancing. Yoga. Volcano climbing. Riding our scooters through gorgeous countryside. Finding amazing places to eat and drink. Sleeping. And all that spare time makes us better learners, because we have the time to refresh, recharge, and most of all assimilate the material that we've learned.

Learning to Learn

One big change in your life when you become a coder: you never stop learning. Technologies, devices and languages change constantly. Whatever specifics you learn in a code camp, it'll look pretty dated in a year or two.

That's why we spend the entire second half of our core bootcamp course building learning skills in our students. Our students are constantly researching technologies, assessing them for use, implementing MVPs (minimum viable products), and integrating them into their projects

When our students graduate, they've already repeated this with dozens of technologies. And that means their skills will stand them in great stead for years or decades.

Occasionally, we get asked if we teach this or that technology, from javascript to integrating maps. Our answer is, with the learning skills you'll build in our course, you'll be ready to expand your skills anywhere you need them to go.

Instructor Roles

As you may have discovered already, we're very proud of our instructor to student ratio. It's the best in the bootcamp sector - 4 to one. And it makes more of a difference than any other single factor.

We organize our instructors in a unique way. There's no hierarchy - none of the idea of a senior instructor, and assistant teachers. That' because all of our insructors are senior devs. There really is no hierarchy between them, although they all bring a unique and personal quality to the class.

Instead, we define our intructors through roles. There are three:

  • Curriculum Lead
  • Technical Lead
  • Pedagogic Lead

Curriculum Lead takes responsibility for the front-line roll out of new exercises and projects on a day-to-day basis;

Technical Lead is the person who you turn to for the tougher problems, the questions that go beyond the curriculum and the current exercise;

Pedagogic Lead has primary responsibility to figure out just how the course is working for each student, and design and implement changes so that each student gets input and a customized learning experience.

We think this last role is what makes our system of instruction really shine. When you're on course, you've always got someone whose job is to ensure that you're getting what you need out of what you've paid a lot of money, and devoted a lot of time to. It doesn't matter if the other two instructors are run off their feet (they won't be, but let's go with it): the Pedagogic Lead is there to help you maximize your bootcamp experience.

Because the Pedagogic Lead talks to students and to the other instructors, they're a great way to ensure that we can improve our courses on a continuous basis. First, they make feedback less personal - sometimes feedback can look like criticism to the person receiving it, and the PL eliminates this. And because they hear from everyone, it makes it possible to adjust and improve in a much smarter way than either reacting to each suggestion, or ignoring the input.

Our Instructor Roles make each instructor more effective, and that results in more time available for one-on-one consulting, personal guidance and generally maximizing your learning and experience on course.

Philosophy

What makes you learn best? Does a bootcamp meet that standard? What is most valuable in the bootcamp experience? We started Ruby on the Beach with those questions.

What we knew right away was that a bootcamp's greatest value is in the ability to spend intensive, focused time, working with industry pros with the experience, and understanding to move you forward. Frustration and roadblocks that occur when you learn on your own or online should be the thing we seek to eliminate.

That in turn meant instructor time, and class size are our highest priorities. We don't think that if you spend the money and time to attend a bootcamp, you should be waiting for the chance to get the help you need. And getting lost in a crowd of 25 or more fighting to get face time with the instructor just sounds like a cumbersome process. We knew that we had to do better than other bootcamps were in these areas to meet our own goals of a truly great, accelerated learning program.

The class sizes and instructor ratios we settled on are the best in the business: maximum 12 students, and always 3 senior developers in attendance. The fact that no-one else has these numbers should be part of what you consider when you decide to attend tech bootcamp.

These committments reflect our philosophy: just about anyone can learn to code. But many people who try fail because they hit a wall of frustration, often more than once. If you create the circumstances where real learning happens - where you get the time you need with senior devs, who have the time to really work with you - you can all but eliminate those negatives. Do all bootcamps meet this standard? We suggest you ask them.

For us, the crucial thing you come to bootcamp for is the chance to spend the time you're learning constantly guided by experienced devs. Not the chance to work excessive hours. When the ratios and sizes are right, those hours drop quickly - and our students find they learn as much in 40 hour weeks as other bootcamps push out in 70.

Requirements

One of the most frequent concerns we hear from people thinking of joining our bootcamp, is that they don't know enough already to be effective.

Our answer to this is, if you already knew what we were going to teach you, why would you go to bootcamp at all? Plus, we've found that those students who have forged ahead to learn code, have often skipped what, for us, are really crucial steps. These are where you establish the best-practices: basic techniques for managing and analysing code, and generally getting up to speed on how a real developer works. We'd rather help you from the beginning - so newbies, apply!

At Ruby on the Beach, we don't have an elaborate pre-work system. What we do have is an interview process focused on figuring you out as a potential learner. Let's not kid ourselves: the things that are hard in week one, seem obvious and natural in week 3. Nothing you need to learn to be an effective programmer is really all that hard; you just need to maintain a positive attitude and stick with it. That's why it's so important to us that Ruby on the Beach provides a super-supportive environment for learning.

So our primary requirements are for intelligence, energy, good attitude (remember, you've got to spend 9 weeks together with everyone else), and something in your past that helps us understand why you want to learn to code. If you've never even looked at HTML, we might ask you about how you know this is for you.

There are other, more basic requirements. You can explore them on our requirements page.

Schedule: 2015-2016

  Ruby Newbie Casually Impressive Incubator
Mid Oct 2015 4 wks -- --
Mid Nov 2015 -- 4 wks --
Jan 2016 -- -- 15 wks
Early 2016 Client Master

Our Courses - An Overview

Courses at Ruby on the Beach are generally four weeks long. We always include a one-week break between any two courses offered sequentially, so our basic program is made up of two courses, and lasts 9 weeks. Courses have daily schedules, and students are expected to attend all classes. As we always say, bootcamp is a group activity, and your participation includes belonging to development teams, so absence affects other participants.

At the same time, we organize our classes, our instruction and our projects so that students can have a sane, balanced and enriching experience. We want your Ruby on the Beach experience to be more than a way to gain skills. Attending Ruby on the Beach will be one of the central experiences in your life: living in a beautiful, engaging place, getting to beaches and temples, meeting new people in and out of the course, travel in Bali and Indonesia, and maybe even learning some of the local languages (optional!) are integral to that. So we don't let our course time take over the time you should be refreshing your mind, exploring and expanding your mind.

We'd think that even if it was a detriment to learning to code. But in fact, the opposite is true. You don't learn better by working past endurance limits: you learn best by working with experienced individuals, so the primary emphasis is on making sure that you have better access to experienced instructors that in any other bootcamp. Period. When that's true, it turns out to be fairly easy to learn the essential skills to allow you to progress as a developer in a fraction of the time on a daily basis, and when considering the length of the program, that other bootcamps take.

Finally, you'll find that the greatly expanded contact time you have with instructors means that you go far beyond the basics, and far beyond the set curriculum. You can work with instructors to shape your experience to more precisely address your goals, while still getting full benefit from courses designed with ensuring all-round ability and employability.

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